Thomas Pead

1578

Object

Artist

Attributed to Cornelis Ketel, Dutch, 1548-1616

Object Info

Object: painting
Currently on view
Object ID: TL-18918

Medium/Technique

Oil paint on panel

Credit

Promised Gift of the Berger Collection Educational Trust

More Info

Dimensions

image height: 33 in, 83.8200 cm; image width: 27 in, 68.5800 cm; frame height: 41 5/8 in, 105.7275 cm; frame width: 35 1/2 in, 90.17 cm; frame depth: 3 3/8 in, 8.5725 cm

Department

European and American Art Before 1900

Collection

European and American Art Before 1900-European Art

Known Provenance

Fellowes family, Shotesham Park, Norfolk; Shotesham Park sale, Christie’s, London, September 25, 1979, lot 379; sale, Sotheby’s, London, November 12, 1997, lot 23; from which acquired by William M. B. Berger and Bernadette Johnson Berger, Denver; Berger Collection Educational Trust; on loan to the Denver Art Museum, TL-18918. Provenance research is on-going at the Denver Art Museum and we will post information as it becomes available. Please e-mail provenance@denverartmuseum.org, if you have questions, or if you have additional information to share with us.

Caption

Attributed to Cornelis Ketel 
Dutch, 1548-1616
Thomas Pead, 1578
Oil paint on panel
Inscribed and dated at upper right, ANO, 1578 / ÆTATIS SVE, 39; on skull, RESPICE FINEM; at upper left, STAT SUA CUIGZ DIES BREVE ET  IRREPARABILE TEMPUS, / OMNIBUS EST VITA SED FAINAM EXTENDERE FACTA, / HOC VIRTUTIS OPUS VIVIT POST FUNERA VITAM. / INTEGRA DUM RES EST SERAM REMINISCERE FINEM /  PREMEDITARE MORI FLAGITIOSA CAVE, / MORS IBI FALCE METET, QUA VITA INDUSTRIA SENET  / VITAGZ SUARESCET MORS UBI FALCE MANET. 
Promised Gift of the Berger Collection Educational Trust, TL-18918

Extended Info

Thomas Pead was Registrar of the Archdeaconries of Norwich in Norfolk and Sudbury in Suffolk. His work entailed recording the counties’ births and deaths, and he is portrayed here with the quill and paper of his profession. Pead’s hand rests on a skull, a further reference to his work and also to a type of painting popular at the time. These “vanitas” pictures urged the viewer to make the most of life because death comes to us all. Ketel’s somber, realistic portrait style was briefly popular in the 1570s. 
 

Exhibition History

  • “Treasures from the Berger Collection: British Paintings 1400-2000” — Denver Art Museum, 10/2/2014 – 9/9/2018