Upcoming Exhibitions

  • Claude Monet
    Exhibition

    Claude Monet

    The Truth of Nature
    Opens October 21, 2019

    The Denver Art Museum will be home to the most comprehensive U.S. exhibition of Monet paintings in more than two decades. The exhibition will feature more than 120 paintings spanning Monet’s entire career and will focus on the celebrated French impressionist artist’s enduring relationship with nature and his response to the varied and distinct places in which he worked. More

  • Ray Eames with the first prototype of The Toy, 1950
    Exhibition

    Serious Play

    Design in Midcentury America
    Opens May 5, 2019

    This exhibition focuses on creative interpretations of play featuring works from 40 groundbreaking designers, including Charles and Ray Eames, Paul Rand, and Eva Zeisel. More

  • Study for Utopia (2018)
    Exhibition

    Eyes On

    Jonathan Saiz
    Opens May 12, 2019

    Jonathan Saiz’s installation #WhatisUtopia is comprised of a column covered with 10,000 tiny drawings, paintings, and sculptures. By definition, utopia is “an imagined community or society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.” The artist employs social media to spark conversation and document responses about our ability to re-envision and embody a modern utopia. More than 10,000 artworks were made to be given away after the end of the exhibition. More

  • The Light Show
    Exhibition

    The Light Show

    Opens June 2, 2019

    The Light Show at the Denver Art Museum explores physical and symbolic representations of light in art through a thought-provoking narrative. The exhibition features about 250 objects drawn from the DAM’s nine curatorial departments. The Light Show focuses on the quest by humanity and artists to understand physical light in the natural world as well as metaphorical, spiritual, and divine representations of light. More

  • Norman Rockwell
    Exhibition

    Norman Rockwell

    Imagining Freedom
    Opens May 3, 2020

    In the 1940s, Franklin D. Roosevelt developed a concept called the Four Freedoms—Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear to persuade Americans to support the war effort. Not immediately embraced by the American public, the administration turned to the arts to help Americans understand and rally behind these enduring ideals. Artists, writers, actors, designers, and musicians were encouraged to take on the challenge of advancing the Four Freedoms as the U.S. prepared to enter World War II, moving away from its policy of neutrality. More