Association, Along Comes Mary, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Grass Roots, and Sopwith Camel at Fillmore Auditorium

Wes Wilson, Association, Along Comes Mary, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Grass Roots, and Sopwith Camel at Fillmore Auditorium, 1966. Ink of paer; 20 1/8 x 14 1/16 in. Partial gift of David and Sheryl Tippit and partial purchase with Marion G. Hendrie Fund, Florence & Ralph Burgess Trust, and other Denver Art Museum funds.

Posters: Storytelling with Words and Images 

Browse through our online poster collection and learn more about Wes Wilson’s poster Association, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco.

Psychedelic posters like Wilson’s were originally created as advertisements for dance concerts. Designs for concert posters were a visual reflection of the experiences one might have at a dance concert. The movement, colors, and images all reflect a concergoer's sensory experience.

YOUR TURN

  • Design your own poster to include a meaningful message.
  • Choose a single sentence that explains your point of view on an issue or subject.
  • Cut out words and images from magazines, advertisements or newspapers that relate to your message.
  • Experiment by rearranging different combinations of images and words until you find one you feel best communicates your perspective.
  • Use a computer program or paper to draw, collage or paint to create your poster.
  • Share your poster with your neighbors! Just like the psychedelic posters of the 1960’s, you might choose to attach your poster to a telephone pole or display it in a window!

Choose a single sentence that explains your point of view on an issue or subject.

Cut out words and images from magazines, advertisements or newspapers that relate to your message.

Experiment by rearranging different combinations of images and words until you find one you feel best communicates your perspective.

Use a computer program or paper to draw, collage or paint to create your poster.

Share your poster with your neighbors! Just like the psychedelic posters of the 1960’s, you might choose to attach your poster to a telephone pole or display it in a window!