The Movement Studio

Movement Studio Demo Artist Kendra Fleischman

Kendra Fleischman will be demonstrating multimedia art in the Movement Studio on August 20–21 & 27–28, 2016.

At the start of my career I was all about dance. Most of my work was exploration of the body moving through space. Now I am exploring how all sorts of things move through time.

– Kendra Fleischman

Brook Lundquist: What can you tell me about your upcoming demonstration?

Kendra Fleischman: Museum visitors will get an inside look at how an artist uses technology to create art. I will be using several computer programs such as Adobe After Effects, Photoshop, Isadora, and Logic Pro to create digital motion pieces.

BL: How would you describe your style as an artist?

KF: I would describe my style as expressionistic, slightly surreal with a bit of whimsy. I often blend past images or experiences with futuristic ideas.

BL: How has your artistic style evolved since the beginning of your career? What would you say has most significantly influenced your development as an artist?

KF: At the start of my career I was more concerned with mastering a media: stone carving, painting, paper making etc. Over several years I began to feel more confident about my mastery over my media and began to focus on expressing ideas or emotions through my art. The constant practice of my craft along with allowing myself to try new media has been the most significant influence on my work. Now, instead of choosing the media first and using the media to drive the idea, I can focus on the emotion or story I want to tell and then use a variety of media to accomplish this.

BL: How do you use movement in your artwork? How will movement be used in this demonstration specifically?

KF: At the start of my career I was all about dance. Most of my work was exploration of the body moving through space. Now I am exploring how all sorts of things move through time. During the demonstration, you will see me working with images and computer-generated animation that change over time and move in beautiful and sometimes dramatic fashion.

BL: Why movement in art? What was the inspiration that led you to incorporate movement into your artistic process?

KF: This is a very good question and I am not quite sure why I am so fascinated with motion. I am currently very interested in automata toys and robots, mainly due to their movement. Maybe I should have been a scientist! However, it isn’t just the physics of motion that I am interested in. It is the beauty and excitement of things in motion. When something moves, it comes alive. It interacts with other things. It uses space. This is what I like about movement in art.

Fleischman is a Denver-based multimedia artist. After studying art at Colorado State University, where she concentrated in sculpture, Fleishman began her career as a professional artist and she has been developing pieces for both private and public collections for more than 20 years. In Colorado, you can see her work outside the black box theater at the Arvada Center in Arvada, at the Lakewood Cultural Center in Lakewood, on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, and in the Benson Sculpture Park in Loveland.

Brook Lundquist is a studio and artist programs intern in the learning and engagement department at the Denver Art Museum. Brook is working toward her bachelor’s degree in art history and studio art at Texas Christian University.