Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism is on view at the Denver Art Museum through January 14, 2018

Gather a Group to See Her Paris

Paintings by Women Artists in 19th Century Paris 

Why DAM Curator Angelica Daneo Thinks Women-Only Art Exhibits Still Matter

—Liz Simmons, The Westword

"Monet, Degas, Renoir, Manet, and Toulouse-Lautrec: They're some of the best-known impressionists. They're also all men. Women artists in nineteenth-century Paris faced an uphill battle in pursuing their craft. The social norm was that women had no business exploring city life on their own. They were excluded from the state-run art school. Despite these challenges, the most passionate women artists of the time made it to Paris, refined their skills, and developed their own unique artistic styles—only to be ignored by art historians more interested in these women's male counterparts.... Her Paris explores the limitations women faced in pursuing professional art careers, as well as ways that these artists resisted such restrictions to create stunning works." Continue reading the full article and interview at Westword.com.

Plan a Ladies Day or Night Out to See Her Paris

Gather a group of friends or family members to see Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism, with more than 80 incredible paintings by progressive women artists such as Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt.

Visit during daytime hours seven days a week, or on a Friday evening when the museum is open until 8 pm. Book now—the exhibition is only in Denver through January 14, 2018.

Groups of 9 or fewer can purchase tickets in advance to guarantee entry at their preferred time. Admission to Her Paris includes general admission, so enjoy exploring the museum while you're here.

Groups of 10 or more people can receive group-rate admission with advance reservations, and schedule private docent-led tours (offered on weekdays with one-week advance reservations required). To make reservations or schedule your group tour, call 720-913-0088 or email groupsales@denverartmuseum.org. Learn more on the group reservations webpage.

Marie Bracquemond, Three Women with Parasols (Trois femmes aux ombrelles [Les trois graces]),

Marie Bracquemond, Three Women with Parasols (Trois femmes aux ombrelles [Les trois graces]), about 1880. Oil paint on canvas; 54-3/4 x 35-1/16. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France. Bequest of Gustave Geffroy, 1926. Photo: Patrice Schmidt. © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926), Children Playing on the Beach, 1884. Oil on canvas. 38 3/8 x 29 3/16 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Alisa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.19. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Berthe Morisot (French, 1841-1895), The Sisters, 1869. Oil on canvas. 20 ½ x 32 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Gift of Mrs. Charles S. Carstairs, 1952.9.2. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Cecilia Beaux, Ernesta (Child with Nurse), 1894. Oil paint on canvas; 50-1/2 x 38-1/8 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York/www.metmuseum.org, Maria DeWitt Jesup Fund, 1965, 65.49. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Cecilia Beaux, Ernesta (Child with Nurse), 1894. Oil paint on canvas; 50-1/2 x 38-1/8 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York/www.metmuseum.org, Maria DeWitt Jesup Fund, 1965, 65.49. Courtesy American Federation of Arts.

Karyn Bocko is the digital marketing associate at the Denver Art Museum. Karyn has been at the DAM since 2014. Her tip for online visitors is to browse a selection of objects from our collection at denverartmuseum.org/collection.