TAG: western American art

Do You See What I Write?
Lesson Plan

Do You See What I Write?

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 45 minute lesson

Students will identify words that reflect the exact opposite of what they see in O’Keeffe’s Petunia and Glass Bottle. They will then think of words that capture what they do see as well as the emotions of the painting, and write a poem or museum placard for the piece.

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A Hunt for Numbers and Colors
Lesson Plan

A Hunt for Numbers and Colors

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 25 minute lesson

Students will look at Hennings’s painting and play a counting game, then go on a hunt for the many colors found within.

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Functional Fashion
Lesson Plan

Functional Fashion

Secondary (grades 6-12)
One 55 minute lesson

Students will focus on the clothing of the vaqueros in Walker’s painting and explore the connections between fashion and function. Students will also design and draw their own pieces of clothing that combine fashion with an unusual function.

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Who’s Got Your Back?
Lesson Plan

Who’s Got Your Back?

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 50 minute lesson

Students will examine Rodeo-Pickup Man and find information that allows them to compare and contrast the roles of people who provide safety across cultures and throughout different time periods.

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Where It’s At
Lesson Plan

Where It’s At

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 50 minute lesson

Students will examine Rodeo-Pickup Man and use clues to determine the elements of story structure apparent in the painting, paying particular attention to setting. Students will then create a setting for a story of their own.

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Horsing Around
Lesson Plan

Horsing Around

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 30 minute lesson

In this lesson children will investigate elements of Rodeo-Pickup Man and participate in activities related to the painting. They will explore sound, color, and their imaginations; and will make their own paintings to share with the class.

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Who Are You Supposed to Be?
Lesson Plan

Who Are You Supposed to Be?

Secondary (grades 6-12)
One 55 minute lesson

Students will observe and discuss Hennings’s painting Rabbit Hunt, choose a character from the piece, and write a narrative from that character’s perspective.

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An Imaginary Romp in the Snow
Lesson Plan

An Imaginary Romp in the Snow

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 45 minute lesson

Through an examination of Theodore Waddell’s Motherwell’s Angus, students will look at colors to understand how artists use them to create sensations and help portray shapes. They will then imagine they are in the painting and write a creative piece about what they experience.

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Illusions of Depth
Lesson Plan

Illusions of Depth

Elementary (grades K-5)
Two 50 minute lessons

Students will use Long Jakes as inspiration to analyze and interpret how artists create a sense of depth on a flat canvas.

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Buck Wild
Lesson Plan

Buck Wild

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 25 minute lesson

Students will look at William R. Leigh’s painting Greased Lightning and imagine stories that explain what might have startled the horse, then they will have the chance to act out their imagined stories.

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Of Course a Horse!
Lesson Plan

Of Course a Horse!

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 25 minute lesson

Using visual observation, illustrations, and words, students compare and contrast two horse art objects, the Han dynasty Horse and Frederic Remington’s The Cheyenne

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It’s in the Eyes
Lesson Plan

It’s in the Eyes

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 45 minute lesson

Students will examine details of facial expression related to O’Keeffe’s Cow Licking. They will then use Cow Licking and other images of eyes to inspire them as they draw multiple pairs of eyes that reflect different emotions.

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The Sounds, Sights & Feel of Nature
Lesson Plan

The Sounds, Sights & Feel of Nature

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 30 minute lesson

Students will examine Bierstadt’s painting Wind River Country, identify what they see, and imagine what’s missing. They will then touch objects similar to those in the painting to connect visual and tactile experiences.

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Possible Perspectives
Lesson Plan

Possible Perspectives

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 55 minute lesson

Students will look at and discuss Coen’s painting Yellow Rain Jacket and write stories from the perspective of either the horse or the champion rider, exploring how the same details can be communicated differently.

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Where to Look?
Lesson Plan

Where to Look?

Secondary (grades 6-12)
One 60 minute lesson

Students learn about the idea of a focal point through Waddell’s painting Motherwell’s Angus. They will have a chance to talk about the methods Waddell uses to establish multiple focal points and sketch out how changing these elements would change the overall feel of the painting.

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Enticing Travel Brochure
Lesson Plan

Enticing Travel Brochure

Elementary (grades K-5)
Two 50 minute lessons

Students will examine Wind River Country and discuss Bierstadt’s manner of creating his paintings in terms of their accuracy and exaggeration of the areas depicted.

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Silent Expeditions
Lesson Plan

Silent Expeditions

Early childhood (ages 3-5)
One 30 minute lesson

Students will look at and discuss how the Kootenai Indians in the painting In the Enemy’s Country remain undetected, then use what they have learned to go on their own silent expedition.

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That Long Jakes
Lesson Plan

That Long Jakes

Elementary (grades K-5)
One 55 minute lesson

Students will compare and contrast the Long Jakes painting to the whimsical illustration for the poem “Backward Bill” by Shel Silverstein.

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The Visual “Language” of Emotions
Lesson Plan

The Visual “Language” of Emotions

Secondary (grades 6-12)
One 45 minute lesson

Students will examine how the composition of O’Keeffe’s Cow Licking influences their reaction to the painting. They will then draw upon what they learn to create a piece of their own.

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Concepts of Cropping
Lesson Plan

Concepts of Cropping

Secondary (grades 6-12)
One 55 minute lesson

Students will look at Donald Coen’s painting Yellow Rain Jacket and discuss the compositional technique he used. Students will then choose a photograph that interests them, crop intriguing sections, and paint the cropped image, emulating Coen’s process.

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