TAG: Logan Lecture Series

Carroll Dunham, Shootist, 2000. Mixed media on linen.

Logan Lecture: Carroll Dunham

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Carroll Dunham’s work explores psychological and formal issues through the depictions of animated, often disconnected, abstract figures and landscapes. More

Leonardo Drew, Number 162, 2012.

Logan Lecture: Leonardo Drew

Monday, February 1, 2016 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Leonardo Drew’s large-scale sculptural installations utilize new materials, which are weathered, burned, oxidized, and decayed to create the look of found objects. More

Jovan Karlo Villalba, A Solstice View From Here, 2011.

Logan Lecture: Jovan Karlo Villalba

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Jovan Karlo Villalba’s interest lies in the possibilities of the imagination. His abstract paintings toy with the experience of the viewer, through the inclusion of reflective materials, such as unpainted stainless steel. More

Mickalene Thomas, Untitled #15, 2015.

Logan Lecture: Mickalene Thomas

 in conversation with Becky Hart
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Inspired by her studies in art history, specifically 19th century portraiture, still-life, and landscape, Mickalene Thomas explores the complexities of womanhood, including the contemporary notion of beauty. More

Hung Liu, We Have Been Naught We Shall Be All (triptych detail), 2007

Logan Lecture: Hung Liu

Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 6:30pm8:00pm.

Hung Liu is known for paintings based on historical Chinese photographs. Her work challenges the authority of documentary images by subjecting them to the more reflective process of painting. She will present a brief survey of her art work over the last four decades, from China to the U.S., from Socialist Realism to Social Realism. More

Beverly Fishman, Untitled ( Depression), 2015. Urethane paint on wood.

Logan Lecture: Beverly Fishman

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

For more than two decades, Beverly Fishman has explored the relationship between the body and medicine by mixing optical patterns and vibrant colors with representational elements taken from pharmaceutical and scientific imaging systems in her largely abstract work More

Trenton Doyle Hancock, Referee, 2014. Acrylic and mixed media on canvas.

Logan Lecture: Trenton Doyle Hancock

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Trenton Doyle Hancock is known for his candy-colored prints, drawings, collaged paintings and site-specific installations. Influenced by the history of painting as well as the pulp imagery of pop-culture, Hancock understands that formal considerations—such as the use of color, texture, text and pattern—are opportunities to create new characters, develop narrative sub-plots and convey symbolic meaning. More

Petah Coyne, Untitled 735, 1992. Gelatin silver print.

Logan Lecture: Petah Coyne

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Petah Coyne’s sculptures convey tension between vulnerability and aggression, innocence and seduction, beauty and decadence, and, ultimately, life and death. Existing between the boundaries of figuration and abstraction, they incorporate unconventional materials such as tree roots, sand, human hair, scrap metal, silk flowers, Velcro, religious statuary, and taxidermy. More

Announcing 3 New Curators at the DAM

Announcing 3 New Curators at the DAM

The Denver Art Museum recently announced that three curators joined the museum. Below is a brief introduction. Stay tuned for more information and opportunities to get to know them and their growing art collections.

Tianlong Jiao, Joseph de Heer Curator of Asian Art More

Scott Hocking, Hephaestus and the Garden of the Gods, Snow (2010).

Logan Lecture: Scott Hocking

Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Scott Hocking creates site-specific installations, using materials found in urban prairies and abandoned architecture, and then photographs his efforts. A native of Detroit, Hocking documents change and transformation caused by forces of nature or man. His interventions reveal often-forgotten histories of place and imbue them mythic importance. More

Virgil Ortiz, Velocity Jar, 2012. Clay, slip, and paint, 10 x 18 x 9 inches. Promised gift from Vicki and Kent Logan to the Collection of the Denver Art Museum. © Virgil Ortiz. Photograph courtesy of King Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ.

Logan Lecture: Virgil Ortiz

Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Join us for an evening with Virgil Ortiz, an internationally renowned ceramicist, fashion designer, and graphic artist from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. Ortiz will speak on his upcoming exhibition of ceramics at DAM that sets a new bar for design. More

Robert Irwin, Central Garden, 1997. The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California. © 2015 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph courtesy of Andreas Praefcke.

Logan Lecture: Robert Irwin

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Associated with the Southern California-centered Light and Space movement, Robert Irwin pioneered the use of light as a primary medium. His “site-conditional” works—from the scrim installations he made in the 1970s, to more recent architecture and landscape projects, such as Dia: Beacon’s building and grounds—call attention to light and perception. Irwin was the first artist to receive the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur “Genius” Award, in 1984.

Doors open at 5:30 pm, lecture at 6 pm (new time) More

Jim Green, Soundwalk, 1992. An original artwork owned and commissioned by the City and County of Denver. © Jim Green. Photograph courtesy of Confluence Denver.

Logan Lecture: Jim Green

Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Denverites love Colorado artist Jim Green for his audial interventions that are installed around town. His Soundwalk, on the 1500 block of Curtis Street; Laughing Escalator, at Denver’s Convention Center; and the Singing Sinks, in the DAM’s North Building, are among his most popular local works, and some of the most beloved public installations in Denver. Green has earned national recognition, including two NEA grants and airtime on NPR, for his innovative use of sound to enliven public space. More

Ben Jackel, Pay Attention, 2012. Pine wood and graphite, 162 x 64 x 11 in. © Ben Jackel. Photograph courtesy of L.A. Louver, Venice, CA.

Logan Lecture: Ben Jackel

Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Colorado native Ben Jackel is storming the art world from Los Angeles with an arsenal of weapons that he’s made from clay and wood. The artist’s enormous halberd and an austere medieval helmet are on display at the DAM this spring on level 4 of the Hamilton Building. Weapons and equipment such as fire hoses and extinguishers fascinate Jackel both as aesthetic objects and because of their association with violence or disaster.

Doors open at 5:30 pm, lecture at 6 pm (new time) More

Yumi Janairo Roth, Cargo Cult, 2009. Mother of pearl inlay and found shipping pallet. © and photograph courtesy of Yumi Janairo Roth.

Logan Lecture: Yumi Janairo Roth

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 6:00pm7:30pm.

Yumi Janairo Roth works with everyday objects to make art that disturbs familiar environments. Her reinventions of banal objects have included decorating plastic traffic cones with ruffled crepe paper, inlaying mother-of-pearl patterns from Filipino furniture onto wooden pallets, and floating hundreds of colorful wooden arrows in Cherry Creek. She’s even navigated unfamiliar places with maps drawn by strangers. By recontextualizing and reformulating in surprising ways, Roth makes work that causes people to reassess what they thought they knew. More

Logan Lecture: Judy Pfaff

Logan Lecture: Judy Pfaff

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 7:00pm8:30pm.

To construct perplexing environments and whimsical sculptures, Judy Pfaff employs myriad materials, such as wire, torn paper, coffee filters, flowers, transparent cord, steel, string, origami objects, Tibetan ledger paper, aluminum foil, fiberglass, plaster, file folders, burned paper, twigs, leaves and fluorescent tubes. In contrast to the materiality of her work and the intrigue of the uncommon elements she uses, she has said, “emotion is my only true sign.” Pfaff has been the subject of an Art 21 program and a recipient of the MacArthur (so-called “genius”) Grant. More

Logan Lecture: Bud Shark

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - 7:00pm8:30pm.

A “Colorado treasure,” master printer Bud Shark is legendary beyond the Rockies. Since 1976, he has been collaborating with many of the most renowned artists of our time who hail from around the world. More than 150 artists, including Red Grooms, William Wiley, Luis Jiménez, Roy De Forest, Peter Saul, Stacey Steers, Italo Scanga, Hung Liu, Enrique Chagoya and Betty Woodman have found their way to Shark's Ink, first in Boulder and now in Lyons. Shark uses techniques as diverse as the artists who have sought him out, and he is known for innovation, collaboration and quality. More

Logan Lecture: Jack Balas

Logan Lecture: Jack Balas

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - 7:00pm8:30pm.

In beautifully rendered images, Jack Balas takes as his subject the idealized male figure. Balas questions why the male figure has largely been ignored in deference to the ubiquitous female subject. For example, in his essay “Where's the Beef? A Look For (And Lack of) The Male Erotic Image in Contemporary Art. Is the Term 'Homo-Erotic' Pejorative?” he advocates for gender balance in figurative art. In the artist’s photographs and paintings, statuesque male figures offer a counterpoint to the traditional sensuous female nude. More

Contemporary Narrative Art: Evolution of Masami Teraoka’s Work to 2014

Contemporary Narrative Art: Evolution of Masami Teraoka’s Work to 2014

with artist Masami Teraoka
Wednesday, September 3, 2014 - 7:00pm9:00pm.

Throughout his career, Japanese artist Masami Teraoka has acknowledged the simultaneous fusion and clashing of East and West. He combines fantasy and humor with darker social issues in paintings and prints that are informed by history, art history, politics, sexuality, the AIDS epidemic and the globalization of American franchises such as Baskin-Robbins and McDonald’s.

For this program, doors open at 6 pm to allow attendees to view At The Mirror: Reflections of Japan in 20th Century Prints on level 2.

Reception with cash bar, 8–9 pm More

5 Things You Can Learn from Artist Brad Kahlhamer

5 Things You Can Learn from Artist Brad Kahlhamer

How to turn found objects into katsina figures and more. More

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