TAG: Europe

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Alfred Sisley
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Alfred Sisley

Alfred Sisley was born and lived in France for most of his life, but inherited British nationality from his father and never received French citizenship. Although he was raised in Paris, he lived in the outskirts of the city for most of his life, finally settling near Fontainebleau in 1880.

Key piece to look for: Seine at Bougival (La Seine à Bougival), 1873 More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Édouard Manet
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Édouard Manet

Édouard Manet primarily worked in Paris, where he painted café singers, horse races, outdoor social gatherings, and other scenes of modern urban life. “We are not in Rome and we don’t want to go there,” he said, expressing his concern that artists should paint contemporary life as they knew it, instead of following the tradition of copying Italian Old Master paintings. “We are in Paris, let’s stay here.” He did occasionally travel to Spain and the Netherlands to study other artists’ work, and to the coasts of France, where he painted The Beach at Berck. More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Berthe Morisot
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Berthe Morisot

Berthe Morisot lived and worked primarily in the Rue des Moulins district of Paris. Her proximity to Paris’ museums and circle of artists gave her the opportunity to study under Camille Corot and become close friends with Édouard Manet, whose brother she eventually married.

Key piece to look for: Lesson in the Garden (La Leçon au Jardin) 1886. More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s family moved to Paris when he was a child, and he worked there for the rest of his career. Always looking for new motifs to paint, he traveled extensively, visiting North Africa, Genoa, and many major European cities. Later in his life, he spent winters in southern France, increasingly preferring the idyllic countryside to the bustling city.

Key piece to look for: Banks of the Seine, Bougival (Bords de la Seine, Bougival),1871 More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec worked in Paris from 1882 to his death in 1901. He is most known for his work between 1891 and 1900, when he lived in Montmartre, a neighborhood of Paris famous for its cabarets, cafes, nightclubs, and brothels.

Key piece to look for: Jane Avril Leaving the Moulin-Rouge¸1892 More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Camille Pissarro
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Camille Pissarro

Camille Pissarro was born in St. Thomas (then part of the Danish West Indies) and lived there most of his young adult life, except when he attended school in Paris from 1842 to 1847. He moved to France in 1855, first establishing himself in Paris and then living in various towns in the countryside outside the city. He did not travel as extensively as other impressionists, choosing to focus on painting the landscapes around the villages he lived in. More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Vincent van Gogh
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh was born in the Netherlands in 1853 and lived there during his formational years as an artist. He briefly attended the Academie des Beaux Arts in Brussels and moved around the Netherlands, immersing himself in the lives of the peasants that he painted. In 1886, he moved to Paris, where he met Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro through his brother Theo, who ran a successful art dealership. He moved to southern France in 1888, where the bright sun and rich landscapes further inspired his vibrant use of color. More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Claude Monet
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Claude Monet

Claude Monet moved to Paris in 1862 and worked in and around the city for the beginning of his career, briefly moving to his family home in Normandy in 1867 due to poverty. In 1870 he moved to London to escape the Franco-Prussian War. He moved to Giverny in 1883 where he spent the rest of his life creating and painting his elaborate flower garden. Facing poverty most of his life, Monet traveled extensively in order to find new subjects to paint and widen the range of appeal for his prospective buyers. More

Rebranded
Exhibition

Rebranded

Polish Film Posters for the American Western
Feb 16, 2014–Jun 1, 2014

Shane, The Misfits, Tom Horn, and Oklahoma! The DAM shows how these movies and other iconic westerns were reinterpreted by Polish artists in Rebranded: Polish Film Posters for the American Western. More

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Paul Cézanne
Blog: Meet the Artist

Passport to Paris Artist Profile: Paul Cézanne

Paul Cézanne worked primarily in Aix-en-Provence, in the South of France. He became a painter only after much disagreement with his father, who encouraged him to study law and banking. Although he regularly spent short periods in Paris, he spent most of the rest of his life in Aix and nearby L’Estaque, where he painted scenes from the surrounding countryside.

Key piece to look for: House in the Country, 1877-79. More

Drawing Room: An Intimate Look at French Drawings from the Esmond Bradley Martin Collection
Exhibition

Drawing Room: An Intimate Look at French Drawings from the Esmond Bradley Martin Collection

Oct 27, 2013–Feb 9, 2014

Drawing Room: An Intimate Look at French Drawings from the Esmond Bradley Martin Collection is part of the exhibition Passport to Paris.

Inspired by the drawings cabinets of gentlemen and connoisseurs, this exhibition will offer a space where visitors can get close to artworks, the intimate nature of which invites contemplation and close-up viewing. Curator Angelica Daneo notes the special immediacy of a work-on-paper where little separates the viewer from the direct hand of the artist. More

Nature as Muse
Exhibition

Nature as Muse

Impressionist Landscapes from the Frederic C. Hamilton Collection and the Denver Art Museum
Feb 12, 2014–Mar 23, 2014

Nature as Muse: Impressionist Landscapes from the Frederic C. Hamilton Collection and the Denver Art Museum was part of the exhibition Passport to Paris. It features the Impressionist masterworks that Denver-based philanthropist Frederic C. More

Court to Café
Exhibition

Court to Café

Three Centuries of French Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum
Oct 27, 2013–Feb 9, 2014

Court to Café: Three Centuries of French Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum is part of the exhibition Passport to Paris.

It features 50 masterpieces from the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut. Masters such as Nicolas Poussin, François Boucher, Edgar Degas, Camille Pissarro, Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Claude Monet will be among those represented. More

Blue Jeans: American or Italian?
Blog: Behind the Scenes

Blue Jeans: American or Italian?

Not so fast! In this blog post, my colleague Karen Brooks stated that denim work pants were developed by Levi Strauss in the 1800s. However, the question is: Where does the iconic fabric come from? More

The Cosmetic Phase
Blog: Conservation

The Cosmetic Phase

Part 11 of Conserving a Canaletto

The idea of reversibility is a very important concept in modern conservation practice. I chose materials with good and known aging characteristics, understanding that my work may need to be removed and/or redone, in the future. It is important that my conservation treatments are reversible. I know that the adhesive I chose to bond the original and lining canvases could be separated in the future and will not cause further harm to the artwork. More

Beginning the Structural Work
Blog: Conservation

Beginning the Structural Work

Part 9 of Conserving a Canaletto

It’s now time to move onto the structural phase of the conservation treatment for the Canaletto work. Structural work entails further securing of any loose media, such as paint or ground, and any repairs if necessary to the canvas and stretcher. Our Canaletto was lined in the past, which means that the original canvas was adhered to a secondary canvas. There are a variety of reasons historically why paintings were lined, but in the case of the Canaletto it was most likely due to the tear in the original canvas. More

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