What it Meant to be Modern, 1910–1965

American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection
Aug 21, 2016–Mar 5, 2017
Oscar Bluemner, Study for Black by Gold

Oscar Bluemner, Study for Black by Gold, about 1934. Gouache, watercolor, and graphite under-drawing on white wove paper, laid down to illustration board. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy.

Charles Burchfield, Sun Setting in a Bank of Smoke

Charles Burchfield, Sun Setting in a Bank of Smoke, 1917. Watercolor and gouache on paper on board. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy. Reproduced with permission of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation.

Charles Sheeler, Red Against the White

Charles Sheeler, Red Against the White, 1957. Tempera on English watercolor board. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy.

Oscar Bluemner, Approaching Black

Oscar Bluemner, Approaching Black, 1932. Casein-oil-resin emulsion and watercolor on paper mounted to millboard. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy.

Oscar Bluemner, Moon Radiance

Oscar Bluemner, Moon Radiance, 1927. Watercolor with gum coating on hot pressed off-white wove paper laid down by the artist to thick wood panel. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy.

Charles Sheeler, New England Irrelevancies

Charles Sheeler, New England Irrelevancies, 1953. Gouache (tempera) and graphite on off-white, lightly textured wove paper. Collection of Karen and Kevin Kennedy.

about

Closed: August 21, 2016–Mar 5, 2017
Hamilton Building - Level 3

What it Meant to be Modern, 1910–1965: American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection brings together the visionary work of Oscar Bluemner, Charles Burchfield, Stuart Davis, John Marin, and Charles Sheeler. The 18 works on paper all share the magic of the modernist movement of the first half of the twentieth century.

Where some of the images flirt with abstraction, as seen in Charles Sheeler and John Marin, others experiment with a pulsing sense of nature endowed with an incredible lightness of being, as does Charles Burchfield. Oscar Bluemner’s pieces glow with mystery and intense color while Stuart Davis gives us a powerful view of the landscape with the shifting planes of perspective. These five artists were chosen for the diversity of their art at a time when a new way of exploring an image reflected a unique and exciting vision of the world around us.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalog, which is available in The Shops and online.

What it Meant to be Modern, 1910–1965: American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection is generously supported by the Eleanor and Henry Hitchcock Foundation.