Threads of Heaven: Silken Legacy of China’s Last Dynasty

Oct 30, 2011–Jan 29, 2012

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Closed: October 30, 2011–Jan 29, 2012
Hamilton Building - Level 2

Drawn exclusively from the DAM’s collection of Chinese textiles and costumes, Threads of Heaven: Silken Legacy of China's Last Dynasty presents a glimpse into the latter years of the court and culture of the Qing Dynasty and the final days of empire in China. Among the approximately 100 pieces on view are court robes and accessories, many of which denote the wearer’s specific rank. In addition to objects from the museum’s Charlotte Hill Grant collection, acquired by the donor in China during the early 20th century, there are numerous pieces either never before exhibited or not seen for many years.

A special ticket will be required for this exhibition and the complementary exhibition, Xu Beihong: Pioneer of Modern Chinese Painting.

Explore QTVR 360-degree panoramic views of Threads of Heaven: Silken Legacy of China's Last Dynasty in the galleries on your desktop or laptop. On the new window that opens, click on the image and drag to change your perspective and click the minus (-) or plus (+) buttons below the image to zoom. Visit Apple.com to download the latest free QuickTime software to view QTVR files.

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