Current Exhibitions

On view through Sunday, June 21, 2015

A visitor favorite since her first appearance in 1984, Linda, is returning to the DAM after a long hiatus. Last on display at the DAM in 2009, Linda has since been kept in darkened, climate-controlled storage to ensure her preservation.

This exhibition also features two other sculptures by John DeAndrea, Clothed Artist and Model, and Nude with Black Drape. The latter is a newly completed work.

On view through Sunday, June 28, 2015

Joan Miró: Instinct & Imagination focuses on artworks the Spanish artist created during the last two decades of his career (1963-1981). Joan Miró's (pronounced Jwan mr-OH) imagination and creativity extended well into his old age. Later in life, he continued the inventive forms for which he is known and began exploring new materials, including bronze. This exhibition features bronze sculptures–including Woman and Bird (Femme et oiseau) (in slide show below)–which have rarely been seen outside of Europe.

On view through Sunday, August 2, 2015

Rupprecht Matthies’ ¿Being Home? is a community-inspired, interactive artwork that grows with each installation. In 2009 and 2011, Matthies collaborated with immigrants at Denver-area community organizations, including the African Community Center, the Emily Griffith Opportunity School, and Centro San Juan Diego, to gather words evocative of notions of home. The resulting words—transformed into mobiles, pillows, and wall pieces—are in 13 languages including English, Spanish, Arabic, and Kareni.

On view through Sunday, August 16, 2015

Sovereign: Independent Voices highlights the work of three leading American Indian contemporary artists, Kent Monkman, Rose Simpson, and Virgil Ortiz, who have received international acclaim. These artists challenge people to think more broadly about the place of native artists in the contemporary art world through a fusion of historic techniques with contemporary styles and ideas. The included works reflect meditations on the self and native histories in a variety of media, including painting, sculptural ceramics, and multimedia works.

On view through Sunday, August 16, 2015

Collectibles, a showcase of works on paper from the Denver Art Museum's collection, demonstrates that drawings are, indeed, collectible. That is, that they are worth acquiring and looking at—from up close and far away, in various arrangements, again and again.

On view through Sunday, September 20, 2015

Barbara Bosworth’s photography explores nature and memory through calm reflection upon places that hold deep personal and social meaning. Using a large format 8x10 camera, Bosworth makes exquisite prints that immerse the viewer in the scene and imbue details—fleeting effects of light and subtle traces of human or natural activity—with arresting presence.

On view through Sunday, September 27, 2015

The 30 artworks in this exhibition reveal the versatility of lacquer as a medium used by Japanese artists to create containers, trays, plaques, braziers, and screens. A wide range of techniques are represented to demonstrate how lacquer was used during the last century to create objects of enduring beauty. The selected artworks reflect the changing styles and tastes of successive generations of lacquer artists who produced designs based on plants, animals, and other elements of nature.

On view through Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Depth and Detail: Carved Bamboo from China, Japan, and Korea showcases a variety of carved, cut, incised, and etched bamboo objects. The exhibition demonstrates how artists used bamboo, carving deeply through it to achieve different colors and textures. The intricate decoration of the items on view includes religious imagery as well as people, animals, birds, insects, plants, and landscapes that tell stories or have symbolic meaning.

On view through Sunday, December 27, 2015

Experience one of the world's premier collections of Native American art. Reopened on January 30, 2011, our remodeled galleries of American Indian and Northwest Coast art focus on artists and their creations, revealing the hand and eye of each individual artist.

On view through Sunday, December 27, 2015

Nampeyo: Excellence by Name is on view in the American Indian art galleries. Nampeyo is recognized as one of the greatest ceramicists of the 20th century. This exhibition traces the full spectrum of the famed Hopi artist’s career, highlighting key elements of her innovative forms and designs and the work of successive generations of her family.

On view through Sunday, January 3, 2016

Angel is a video that explores the theme of religion and features Wallinger playing Blind Faith, his sightless alter ego. The artist is seen repeatedly reciting—backwards—the first five verses of St. John's Gospel from the King James version of the Bible. The spectator is asked to consider religious belief in a realm beyond the visible.

Recent Modern & Contemporary Acquisitions
On view through Sunday, January 3, 2016

Gifts, promised gifts, and works that the museum purchased over the last seven years are the focus of our next rotation in the modern and contemporary galleries.

The collection is the principal artery of a museum. It’s here where the idea for the next big show might be sparked, where artists and amateurs alike find their inspiration and a museum shapes its identity. Especially in modern and contemporary art, a continuous and strategically growing collection becomes the showcase of our time. It reflects who and where we are now and tells future generations about us.

On view through Sunday, January 10, 2016

Cubism was the most revolutionary and influential movement of the twentieth century. After Renaissance artists perfected the device of perspective, a painting was thought of as a window into the world. But cubist painters understood that canvases themselves were painted objects. They also rejected the idea that an object rendered with traditional perspective was any more “real” than an abstraction of that object on the flat surface.

On view through Sunday, January 10, 2016

Virgil Ortiz is an internationally renowned ceramicist, fashion designer, and graphic artist from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. He uses contemporary art to blend historic events with futuristic elements. Set against Ortiz’s graphic murals, this exhibition features 31 clay figures and invites visitors to immerse themselves in a storyline that Ortiz created that begins with the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. This is the first exhibition of his work to visually tell the whole story.

On view through Sunday, February 28, 2016

Following nearly one year of conservation treatment, an Italian masterwork discovered in the Denver Art Museum storage is on view. Since spring 2012, we have been writing updates about behind-the-scenes discoveries and decisions related to the restoration.

On view through Sunday, April 10, 2016

This spring, New York-based artist Francisco Alvarado-Juárez will transform the Precourt Discovery Hall into a whimsical environment for family audiences using recycled paper from thousands of grocery paper bags, painted and cut by hand. Created in collaboration with local community groups, the seaweed-like bags will camouflage paintings of insects—partially hidden by the protruding bags—creating another opportunity for discovery as visitors move through the space.

Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America
On view through Sunday, November 27, 2016

During the Spanish Colonial period in Latin America (1521–1850), precious gold and silver were crafted into elegant jewelry then embellished with emeralds from Colombia, coral from Mexico, and pearls from Venezuela. Wanting to demonstrate their wealth and status, people were painted wearing their finest dress and elaborate jewelry.

On view through Sunday, April 16, 2017

Celebrated for his multidisciplinary approach to art and design, Herbert Bayer called painting "the continuous link connecting all the facets of my work." The paintings presented in the exhibition give us a window into the personal side of this versatile artist.

The Art of Bark Cloth
On view through Sunday, August 27, 2017

This reinstallation of the Joan & George Anderman Gallery of Oceanic Art offers a glimpse at the variety of creative design and ingenious construction possible through the unique medium of bark cloth (or tapa) used across the Pacific. Techniques and styles for decorating varied from island group to island group. Painted, printed, and beaten patterns decorate supple and sometimes expansive bark cloths. Elaborate masks made with tapa stretch over rigid stick or cane frames.