TAG: Conservation

The Conservation of Linda's Modern Materials 
Blog: Conservation

The Conservation of Linda's Modern Materials 

How Did John DeAndrea Achieve Such Lifelike Qualities?

The highly realistic sculpture Linda by Colorado artist John DeAndrea has been a visitor favorite at the Denver Art Museum since it became a part of the collection in 1984. Linda is also an important work of contemporary art in which DeAndrea made innovative use of a material that was fairly new to art at the time: plastic. This is why Linda is of such interest to us in the museum’s conservation department. More

Video still taken from a series of videos documenting the conservation of a Spanish Colonial table cover at the Denver Art Museum. This image shows a textile conservator repairing the tapestry.
Blog: Conservation

Conserving a Spanish Colonial Table Cover (Videos)

This series of videos tracks the progress of a Spanish Colonial table cover as the museum's staff prepares it for exhibition. Watch as curators examine it and explore its history, and textile art conservators test and repair the tapestry. More

Conservation of a King: Aesthetic Compensation & Next Steps (Part 4)
Blog: Conservation

Conservation of a King: Aesthetic Compensation & Next Steps (Part 4)

Conservation treatment of King Caspar is almost finished. Having completed the structural portion of the treatment which included filling cracks, repairing broken elements, and stabilizing loose joints, I moved on to the aesthetic portion of the treatment. The goal of this part of the treatment was to unify the overall appearance by filling areas where the paint and/or gesso was lost to bring them to the same level as the surrounding surfaces. More

Conservation of a King: Surface Cleaning & Structural Stabilization (Part 3)
Blog: Conservation

Conservation of a King: Surface Cleaning & Structural Stabilization (Part 3)

My initial examination revealed that the sculpture of King Caspar was in poor condition. Many of the wooden joints were loose; some pieces were broken and missing. The paint and barniz chinesco surfaces were actively flaking and the sculpture was very grimy. In collaboration with curator Donna Pierce, I designed a treatment plan that will restore the structural stability of the sculpture so that it can be handled, studied, and displayed safely. We also decided to pursue aesthetic compensation so that it can be effectively understood as a devotional object. More

Conservation of a King: Developing a Treatment Plan (Part 2)
Blog: Conservation

Conservation of a King: Developing a Treatment Plan (Part 2)

One of the first steps of any conservation treatment is to closely examine the object, creating written and photographic records of its current state. Conservators do this using a variety of tools and methods. I started to examine King Caspar by looking closely under normal light. Then, I began to change the angle and intensity of light, eventually adding magnification (via a stereomicroscope). More

Conserving a Spanish Colonial Sculpture
Blog: Conservation

Conserving a Spanish Colonial Sculpture

DAM Blog Series Documents Conservation Treatment of King Caspar

Follow our four-part series on conserving an eighteenth-century statue of King Caspar, one of the Magi often included in the Nativity. More

Conserving Shattered Silk in an Early 20th Century Souvenir Ribbon Quilt
Blog: Conservation

Conserving Shattered Silk in an Early 20th Century Souvenir Ribbon Quilt

Lyrical, structured, bold, colorful, whimsical, meticulous, commemorative, and even “crazy," the quilts currently on display in First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection cover a staggering amount of design territory. Enticing the viewer’s eye to the back of the gallery is a striking grid of red and black interspersed with a rainbow of other colors. More

Canaletto - Frame Conservation
Blog: Conservation

Canaletto - Frame Conservation

Part 12 of Conserving a Canaletto

Also part of the TEFAF was the conservation of the painting’s frame. The frame is "period," meaning stylistically it is of similar age as that of the painting, but not original to our Canaletto. This is not surprising since frames, historically, were not really perceived as works of art themselves and, indeed, the idea of placing a higher value on the “package” of both the painting and its original frame is a relatively new concept. Our frame is constructed of wood with hand-carved elements originally gilded using water and oil gilding techniques. More

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