Share Your Pet's Photo in Stampede: Animals In Art
#DAMpets

How to Take a Great Pet Photo

6 Tips from Experts

See Your Pet on the Gallery Wall

For the exhibition Stampede: Animals in Art the Denver Art Museum invites visitors to share photos of your pets on Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #DAMpets. These photos will appear in the exhibition’s “Beloved” section in a livestream on a framed iPad hung side-by-side with artworks from DAM’s collections. You will find this section on level 3 of the DAM’s Hamilton Building.

Upload your pet photo and use the hashtag and maybe you'll see Fluffy or Spot on the gallery wall! (There's up to a 10-minute delay.)

Framed portraits of pets on a wall in the Beloved section of the Stampede exhibition

Puurfect Shots of Your Cat & Pretty Pictures of Your Pooch

Looking for tips and tricks to keep in mind when trying to get the puurfect shot of your cat or a pretty picture of your pooch? Denver-based photographers Kris Phillips of Furever Friends Pet Photography and Ariane Delafosse Uhll of DelaFoto Pet Photography shared the following advice:

1. Be patient

According to Kris Phillips the most important thing to keep in mind is that it takes patience to get the perfect photo, “It's easy for people to get frustrated trying to photograph a wiggling pup who just won't sit still and look at the camera,” she said. “But as soon as you stress out, your pet begins to think they're in trouble and it'll only go downhill.”

2. Make it fun

Ariane DelaFosse Uhll says “If you are anxious, your pet will be, too.” To get the best photo, she recommends you make it fun for you both.

3. Consider the location

DelaFosse Uhll says that she always considers a pet’s favorite place before deciding where to set up a photoshoot. “Pick the best setting for them to be comfortable and be themselves,” she said. Regardless of where you are, DelaFosse Uhll says to be sure to find a location that has minimal distractions.

4. Lighting is key

Both photographers say that lighting is an important aspect of getting the perfect photo. Bright outdoor light can make animal coats shine, but be cautious of making sure your shadow doesn’t end up in the photo. Try to avoid dim lighting if possible. Flash can cause cast shadows and red eyes.

5. Reward them

Whether it’s to get an animals attention or to reward them for being such a good poser, both photographers suggest bringing treats, toys, and other rewards with you when photographing a pet.

6. Get Low

For both photographers, getting on the animal’s level has been a great way to get the shot. “If you really want a quality shot of your pet, get down on their level, or even lower,” Phillips said. “Kneel down or even lay on your belly in the grass. Not only will you get a great picture but I'll bet your pet won't be able to resist coming to roll around with their favorite human.”

Carolyn Davidson was the 2017 summer writing intern in the marketing department at the Denver Art Museum.